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20121027
20121104
STATION
CNN 5
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MSNBC 5
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CNBC 3
KQED (PBS) 2
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LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
president al gore talking about hurricane katrina in his 2006 academy winning documentary, an inconvenient truth. the movie for those of you who have not seen it, warns us that due to climate change, we will experience many more super storms like sandy which forecasters say was the largest hurricane in atlantic history. climate change deniers will say the weather has always been weird. here are some inconvenient truths that they may want to consider. in the 1970s, there were just an average of under eight named storms per year. named storms like the a b c. in the 198hehe ample w ju ju u uerer nine ---- the average was just under nine per year. in the 1990s, it was about 11 named storms per year. in the 2000s it jumped to nearly 15 storms a year and get this, in the first three years of this decade, 2010, 2011, 2012 the average is just under 19. specifically, we had 19 named storms in 2010. we had 18 in 2011 and so far we've had 19 named storms and there is an entire month left in hurricane season this year
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
, there is debris everywhere but there isn't just devastation. this is an katrina that watch everything away. these buildings still exist. there is a heck of a clean up here to do but this can come back. a little worse down the beach in seaside heights and atlantic city but it will come back but look. look at this debris. junk everywhere. this is going to take a while. this is the roof of the tiki bar which is 300 yards up the beach. this was the roof of it and that is deposited here. i leave you with this shot at the atlantic ocean. it occurred to me today that as i look out there it is almost like nothing happened. the ocean is saying i was upset but i am calm now. i may not stay calm forever but you are good for while. connell: that pictures of beautiful and to come back to the isolation is jarring. what stood out to you today? today is the first day you had a chance to walk around the. >> exactly. the first sunny day. the first real nice day. you hit it exactly right. the contrast in the devastation and the beauty. this is typically what we see after hurricane. took a couple extra days b
the economic effects. i think comparing this episode to katrina, which is the analog a lot of people are working with, for the most part i would say on balance, there's a lot of short-term turmoil, a lot of things happening. it's the end of the month. we've already got a lot of other anxiety out there. and it's in the middle of earning season so we'll have some delays. on the other hand, if we look at markets in '05, there was an initial selloff but markets sort of gained traction, especially as people saw past the short-term economic effects and saw the lift coming from the spending. >> no doubt about it, we have end of month positioning, so if you're sitting on positions and you need to get out of those positions for whatever reason, because it's the end of the month, you can't do it. the markets are closed. and so i'm wondering if this is creating a pent-up situation where we see a heavy selloff once markets do resume on wednesday. we're hoping for wednesday. we haven't seen a two-day closing of markets, i don't think ever. >> that's right. >> i think it's possible we could see so
following a critical disaster. he got the port of new orleans up and running after hurricane katrina in 2005. gary lagrange joins us now from new orleans. welcome to the program. it is good to see you here. if the port of new york were to make a call to you and say, look, gary, you've done this before, what should we do? what would you say to them? >> well, first, i think the port of new york, new jersey is in great hands. admiral rick larabie has weathered the storm many times before. the communications aspect is first and foremost about anything. the pilots, noaa, coast guard, army corp of engineers, all staying in touch with each other to ensure that the port and the harbor can open just as quickly as possible to assure that the safeguard and movement of commerce is first safe, but also expeditious as well. because of the magnitude of a port like new york, new jersey, just is an absolute must. a huge market area. many consumers relying on it. >> more broadly, ceos who are obviously attempting to hold businesses together and ensure that they function, many of them in a very, very difficult
spiriva. sxwrirchlgts we talk about katrina. there is the long island express as well that was hit in the middle east. it claimed hundreds and hundreds of lives. the death toll was so high. there was hardly any warning or preparation for that matter. well, in the wake of this week's superstorm time magazine is exploring ways to protect people and property from these monster hurricanes. brian joins us live from new york. brooen, it's great to see you. first of all, very compelling articles here. i want to start off by talking about the power grid. you've got millions of folks along the east coast still without power. now they are freezing. we're going to talk about the real cold temperatures coming up over the weekend. how do we focus on the power system to make it more resilient, stronger? >> well, one thing you can do is to look actually at buried power lines. 18% of distribution lines in the u.s. are actually underground. of course, if they're above ground, then they're vulnerable to being knocked down by trees, which is what's happened in all kinds of storms, including a big one
katrina where it was failures on the part of the federal government's response. you don't have that negative aspect. you have chris christie, the most visible republican in the country. certainly according to the media one of the better liked ones. he's out there using his platform to vouch for the leadership of the democratic president. i think that makes a powerful statement to people. i think having bloomberg weigh in makes a pretty strong statement to people as well. and i think just -- it's tough to quantify this. i think it's impossible to quantify this. to me it creates this noise that's sort of in the air, in the media air, and sort of in the conversational air in this country. it creates noise that i think takes wavering voters who maybe were soft obama supporters or soft romney supporters, i could see it moving them, you know, a small share of people, but i could see it moving people toward obama making them more comfortable with the idea of re-electing him. if it's a 1% or something, small, but it's big in the context of this election. >> in the context of endorsemen
to colonel owen of the army corps of engineers who was in new orleans after hurricane katrina, and he said that new york city is a much more complex problem because these tunnels are so deep and they are so long. and the path tunnel may be even luckier, if you will, than the subway tunnels because the subway tunnels, the system that just had its 108th birthday on saturday, one day before hurricane sandy hit. some of the electrical equipment in the tunnel -- some are so old they don't know what is the affect of salt water eroding the tunnels. one thing that struck me is that governor cuomo was talking quite firmly yesterday and today about climate change and how climate change has made lower manhattan much more vulnerable to these storm surges and has made the subway system vulnerable, which is unfortunately something that what was predicted and predictable. >> well, it's also something -- i was talking to a climate change expert today. it is only going to get worse. we have seen the water rise a foot over the last 100 years but the next 100 years should be rising in an area of two three fe
this. this is staten island. this is a scene reminiscent of the aftermath of katrina. the nypd was called in to rescue people trapped on their rooftops by rising water. this is taped footage. all five adults and one child were saved from their homes as they were -- as they were trying to get away from the water there. all right. wall street, though, is going to open for business today. that's one of our first signs of normalcy after a two-day shutdown. we'll find out what we can expect, get a preview, plus the nick impact of the storm. mayor michael bloomberg will ring the opening bell and we'll bring that to you live. today's are trivia question. who was the last republican ele elected to the senate from the state of new jersey? the first correct answer will get a follow wednesday from us. a picture of hoboken folks this morning. very sobering to see with all the clouds gone, helicopters coming up, we now see the true devastation that is still impacting the state of new jersey. people really love snapshot from progressive, but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy pro
. look, people warned katrina that new orleans needed to be able to withstand a category 5. they didn't design the levees to withstand it and we see what happened. now we see the same thing with sandy. i think the hope has to be that sandy isn't short for cassandra and that it's another warning that we ignore. absolutely people now have seen that you can in fact have the worst-case scenario, which was a flooding of the lower manhattan and i think any city along the eastern sea board has ask-to-ask themselves what would happen if hurricane sandy hit us? >> suarez: well, how do we price risk, then, into the decisions we make both publicly and privately. should there with b places in new jersey, in new york, where insurance companies say "we don't want to pay for you to rebuild right there"? where the cost of doing so becomes higher and maybe prohibitive for some people? >> there probably should be, yes, because the alternative is we keep enticing people to place more and more of their value, more and more of their wealth in fragile co-systems or fragile areas of the environment if we do
. joining us now to talk about this is dr. erwin redlenner, he has studied how hospitals handled katrina. he knows everything, really, about disaster preparedness. and doctor, i have to ask you this. we've seen a lot of businesses, big businesses like goldman sachs, big buildings downtown on generator power. they're up and running. why not a hospital? >> well, it's not clear why not a hospital. and one of the problems here is initially, years ago, we had generators in the basements of hospitals, which is obviously something that doesn't really work, because when they get flooded, the generators go out. so they moved the generators up to higher elevations, but leave the fuel pumps down in the basement. and those fuel pumps are susceptible to flooding. it's just a detail that turns the out to be extraordinarily important when the time comes to actually use those generators. >> seems like a crucial detail right now. the president of new york city is helping the hospital corporation, asked by cnn's erin burnett last night, if hospitals were ready for this. let's listen to his answer. >> well, th
, but then we all remember the damage that hurricane katrina did to president bush. >> john we heard bill plante report that president obama cancelled that event this morning in orlando, florida, but bill clinton picked up the slack and held that rally now. now we know that bill clinton will be in seven states in the coming week. how much is that a help to the obama team? >> well, without putting too fine a point on it you can imagine the situation in which that helps quite a lot. bill clinton having received better reviews at the democratic convention than the sitting president. bill clinton is hugely popular in the democratic base. so getting those crowds out is important because in the states they take them from the events to the polling places and you grab them and you say, come knock on doors with me this weekend. spend more time volunteering to get these votes out. so it's important that the gathering function of these events continue to happen. and with bill clinton being a big draw he's the best surrogate barack obama could have in these crucial states. >>
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)